Nigerian Doctors in South Africa and HPCSA registration

Nigerian doctors in South Africa

Nigerian doctors in South Africa are governed by the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), a professional body for health care practitioner in South Africa. HPCSA is registered as a statutory professional body with the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA).

In 2018, it was confirmed that there were 680 Nigerian doctors in South Africa that were registered with HPCSA (as at 2 July 2018).

Related Article

The mandate of HPCSA

HPCSA guides and regulates the health professions in the country (including Nigerian doctors in South Africa) in aspects pertaining to registration, education and training, professional conduct and ethical behaviour, ensuring continuing professional development, and fostering compliance with healthcare standards.

Nigerian doctors in South Africa

All individuals (including Nigerian doctors in South Africa) who practise any of the health care professions incorporated in the scope of the HPCSA are obliged by the Health Professions Act No. 56 of 1974 to register with the Council. Failure to do so constitutes a criminal offence.

The Health Professions Council of South Africa confers the following designations:

  • Medical Practitioners e.g.
    Nigerian doctors in South Africa
  • Dental Practitioners
  • Psychologists
  • Oral Hygienists
  • Dental Assistants
  • Dental Therapists

Internships and community service for Nigerian doctors in South Africa

Doctors trained abroad need to apply to the HPCSA for registration. Some may be exempted from a board exam, while others may have to write the exam. The purpose of board examinations is to measure the academic and clinical competence and capacity of foreign qualified practitioners (Nigerian doctors in South Africa qualified in Nigeria) wishing to enter the profession for community service, supervised practice or independent practice. They may subsequently be required to perform supervised practice for up to two years or internship. The duration and domains of internship training or supervised practice for foreign qualified practitioners will be determined by HPCSA based on norms set for the same. After successful completion of two years internship, the doctor will be registered by the HPCSA as a doctor and will need to complete a year in the service of the DOH. This is known as community service. The DOH determines all community service posts and no supervision is required. All healthcare professionals, including dieticians, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists, are obliged to complete one year of community service (HPCSA Bulletin, 2017).

Verification of Qualifications of Nigerian Doctors in South Africa

The Health Professions Council of South Africa uses the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) for verification of medical credentials of international practitioners (e.g. Nigerian doctors in South Africa) applying for registration to practice medicine in South Africa.

ECFMG is a global leader in health care—serving physicians, members of the medical education and regulatory communities, health care consumers, and those researching issues in medical education and health workforce planning.

Nigerian doctors in South Africa and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates

Step 1: The HPCSA requires practitioners who obtained their basic medical qualification outside of South Africa to use ECFMG’s Electronic Portfolio of International Credentials (EPICSM) to have their medical credentials verified (e.g. Nigerian doctors in South Africa).

All new applicants who obtained their basic medical qualification outside of South Africa are required to establish an EPIC account, if they do not have one already.

Step 2: Practitioners are required to upload their credentials to EPIC for verification.

Electronic Portfolio of International Credentials

EPIC is an innovative, online service that practitioners (e.g. Nigerian doctors in South Africa) can use throughout their careers. Through EPIC, practitioners will be able to build a digital career portfolio of the primary-source verified credentials related to their medical education, training, and registration/license. They can then use EPIC to request reports verifying the authenticity of their credentials be provided to any organisation in the world, including medical regulatory authorities and potential employers, such as hospitals and academic institutions.

Nigerian Doctors In South Africa – Fake Facts and Figures

How often do you change your mind about things you believe to be true? What if I told you that you and I don’t change our minds about facts we believe to be true, even after those facts are proven to be false?

Well, don’t shoot the messenger! This was proven in studies by researchers at Stanford in 1975 and confirmed by thousands of other researchers. Still don’t believe it? Read the findings in the book “Denying to the Grave: Why We Ignore the Facts that Will Save Us”.

At this point, you are probably wondering ‘what does this have to do with Nigerian doctors in South Africa?’. Don’t worry, we’ll get to that shortly.

Isn’t it dangerous for people to share fake news and figures?

The research proves that when someone forms a belief about something, they don’t usually change their mind about it. This human characteristic makes fake news and fake statistics very dangerous. If we don’t change our minds about important facts, then isn’t it dangerous for people like government officials and journalists to share fake news and figures?

Questioning fake news and fake statistics with a Nigerian example

Guess what? Despite the dangers of sharing unproven claims and figures, many people in powerful positions continue to spread false facts and figures. A good example of this was documented in an article by our partners at Nigerians In South Africa. In the article, “We have 680 registered Nigerian doctors in South Africa not 5000 – HPCSA”, Nigerians In South Africa challenged a false figure presented by a government official and a number of Nigerian media houses.

Standing up against false news and false figures

Media houses such as Vanguard Nigeria and Daily Trust reported on the figures presented by the government official (Godwin Adama, the Consul General of Nigeria in South Africa) without investigating the alleged figures.

The False Figure: There are 5000 Nigerian doctors are in South Africa.
The Real Figure: There are 680 registered Nigerian doctors in South Africa (as at 2 July 2018).

Nigerians in South African successfully confirmed that there are 680 registered Nigerian doctors in South Africa (as at 2 July 2018), not 5000.

Stand out by doing  your own research about the validity of the facts

How did they confirm this? Click here to read the article on their website, www.nigeriansinsouthafrica.co.za.

The next time you read an important news article that has the power to influence your beliefs, ask yourself – what damage will this article cause if it turns out to be false? If the potential damage is big then do your own research about the validity of the facts presented in that article.

Credit

This blog post was inspired by the article “We have 680 registered Nigerian doctors in south Africa not 5000 – HPCSA” written by Nigerians In South Africa on www.nigeriansinsouthafrica.co.za

Nigerians in South Africa: Globetrotters, Pros & Wanderers [Opinion]

Why are Nigerians flocking to South Africa? What are they doing here? And what are their plans?

To answer these questions, we first need to differentiate between three types of Nigerians living in South Africa. It is important to note that the main differentiating factor between the three is their ‘intention for relocating to South Africa’. Based on this, we have formulated three categories of Nigerians living in South Africa, namely; Globetrotters, Pros and Wanderers.

1. The Globetrotters – Widely travelled Nigerians

The Globetrotters are Nigerians in South Africa who have travelled and/or lived in developed countries such as the USA and UK.

This category of Nigerians see South Africa as a rebound or Plan B. Having lived in a developed country, they have become accustomed to the comfort and convenience that comes with living in a developed country. As a result, they do not see themselves being able to cope with the harsh living conditions in Nigeria. Having had an uninterrupted supply of water and electricity, they can no longer tolerate not having either one of these regardless of how much they love their country. They see South Africa as the best of both Africa and the Western world. With its world class infrastructure and relatively stable governance, South Africa is perfect for this category of Nigerians.Passport and bags packed

2. The Pros – Highly skilled Nigerian professionals

The Pros usually relocate to South Africa in pursuit of personal and career growth. These individuals are typically self motivated and have a solid plan for achieving success in their chosen career.

This category consists of highly skilled professionals such as doctors, project managers, academics, and masters/ doctoral students.
As sought after professionals in their respective fields, they are good at their jobs and are in South Africa to advance their careers. Their goal for relocating to South Africa is to make a better living for themselves and their families. These talented Nigerian professionals love the African continent and are proud to be part of a thriving African country. They enjoy the orderliness and opportunities that South Africa presents to professionals. Their long term plans are to stay permanently in South Africa and make a name for themselves while also developing the country and its people.

Nigerian doctors in South Africa

3. Wanderers – Nigerians who drift from one African country to another with the aim of settling in a developed country.

Wanderers see South Africa as a gateway/transit point to travel to a developed country.

This third category of Nigerians have no desire to officially settle in South Africa. They have their heart set on bigger and better countries and have applied to or tried to obtain visas from the likes of Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Wanderers spend months or even years accumulating just enough funds to leave South Africa for ‘greener pastures’. They usually have no set career and are self-employed e.g. hairdressers/ barbers and small shop owner.

Wandering nigerians

What do you think of our three categories of Nigerians in South Africa? Do you agree or disagree with our opinion piece? Please leave your comment below and see what happens.

Lagos to Jozi is also on YouTube

Related article: Audio: 3 questions for Nigerians coming to South Africa [Listen]

20 Registered Non-Profit Organisations for Nigerians in Gauteng

There are many personal and communal benefits associated with volunteering in non-profit organisations.

Non-profit organisations can be a great source of skills transfer, support and networking opportunities for members and volunteers.

In the article, Registered Non-Profit Organisations for Nigerians in South Africa, I listed eight non-profit organisations for Nigerians in six provinces (excluding Gauteng) in South Africa. This time around, the list has twenty five registered non-profit organisations for Nigerians in Gauteng.

The following NPOs are registered with the Department of Social Development in South Africa and established under the Non-profit Organisations Act 71 of 1997.

1. The Nigeria Intrepreneurs` Forum South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 031-760 NPO

Registration Date: 11/03/2004

 

2. Global Alliance For Redeeming Nigeria’s Image Abroad

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 045-437 NPO

Registration Date: 24/11/2005

 

3. Igbo-Ukwu Development Union

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 056-568 NPO

Registration Date: 28/08/2007

 

4. Ohanaeze Ndi Igbo Southern Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 062-620 NPO

Registration Date: 25/06/2008

 

5. World Igbo Heritage and Cultural Institute South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 067-293 NPO

Registration Date: 06/03/2009

 

6. Nigeria Football Club

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 078-059 NPO

Registration Date: 29/03/2010

 

7. Nzuko Ndi-Igbo Community Care South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 080-116 NPO

Registration Date: 24/05/2010

 

8. Nigerian Doctors` Forum South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 101-421 NPO

Registration Date: 27/03/2012

 

9. The Nigeria Igbo Community in Ekurhuleni South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 116-419 NPO

Registration Date: 01/03/2013

 

10. Global Investment Initiative for Nigeria South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 118-898 NPO

Registration Date: 18/04/2013

 

11. United Nigerian Wives in South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 124-371 NPO

Registration Date: 13/07/2013

 

12. Igbogili Ruma Progressive Union

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 140-349 NPO

Registration Date: 13/08/2014

 

13. Peoples Club Of Nigeria Int. South Africa Chapter

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 146-964 NPO

Registration Date: 06/01/2015

 

14. Nigerian Community South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration number: 147-084 NPO

Registration Date: 07/01/2015

 

15. Nigerian Union South Africa (NUSA)

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 148-233 NPO

Registration Date: 02/02/2015

 

16. Nze Ozo Ndi Igbo Southern Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 157-114 NPO

Registration Date: 18/08/2015

 

17. Congress For New Nigeria (C.N.N.)

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 160-864 NPO

Registration Date: 27/10/2015

 

18. Awka-Etiti Improvement Union Association Nigeria South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 193-212 NPO

Registration Date: 25/07/2017

 

19. Nigeria Muslim Jama’T

Province: Gauteng

Registration Number: 188-002 NPO

Registration Date: 03/04/2017

 

20. Igbo Ezuo South Africa

Province: Gauteng

Registration number: 198-489 NPO

Registration Date: 03/11/2017

Leaving Nigeria for South Africa? Read This First!

South Africa is a beautiful country. However, immigrating to South Africa when you are Nigerian, na very big decision. But, make you no scatter your brain o. We have 15 tips to help you plan well well.

A man cannot sit down alone to plan for prosperity – Nigerian Proverb

1. Location

South Africa has 9 provinces (states) and over 70 towns and cities. Choose your preferred location wisely o.

South Africa, Johannesburg - Nelson Mandela Cable Bridge
South Africa, Johannesburg – Nelson Mandela Cable Bridge

In the United Kingdom, East London is a popularly and informally defined part of London. In South Africa, East London is a city in the Eastern Cape province. Know the difference! Do not get scammed.

Ask Yourself: Which province and town/city will I be living in? How much do I know about the place? Is the area safe for African immigrants? Do I know anyone in that area? Has this area had issues with xenophobic attacks?

2. Accommodation

Use property websites such as Property24 and Private Property to find accommodation in South Africa, while you are still in Nigeria.

Unlike in Nigeria, rent is paid monthly in South Africa and it can be relatively expensive (depending on the property type and where you are renting the property).

Ask Yourself: How much do different property types (house, flat, townhouse etc.) cost in my preferred province? Will I be renting from an agency or homeowner?  Will I be living alone or sharing? Will I be renting a room or the whole property? What are my rights as a tenant?

3. Income

The average cost of living for one person living in the City of Johannesburg is R8500 (N225 462.55) per month (University of the Witwatersrand: 2017).

University of the Witwatersrand: 2017).

South Africa has an expanded unemployment rate of 36.3%; which means over 9.2 million people are unemployed in South Africa (Statistics South Africa, 2018).

Your income will need to cater for rent, food and transport (among other things). You need a job or a business that will cover your monthly expenses. If you will be going the job route then find the job while in Nigeria. If you will be going the business route then start it while in Nigeria (if possible). Make sure that you have permission from the South African government (a valid permit) to work or conduct business in the country.

Already in South Africa but struggling to find job and/or business opportunities? Consider volunteering at one of the Registered Non-Profit Organisations for Nigerians and relatives in South Africa.

Ask Yourself: What is my current source of income in Nigeria? What will be my source of income in South Africa? How much will I need to earn every month to cover living expenses?

South African Rands and Cents

4. Currency

Change your money into the local currency (South African Rand) at the airport.

Do not pay for anything in dollars in South Africa. Think in rands and nairas not dollars. 

Find out local prices and naira equivalent while you are still in Nigeria, e.g. taxi fare, airtime/credit, food, accommodation. Convert South African Rands to Nigerian Naira on https://themoneyconverter.com/ZAR/NGN.aspx.

Ask Yourself: Do I have enough to survive in South Africa for at least 6 months? How much does everything cost in South African Rands versus Nigerian Naira?

5. Banking

Money is a sensitive matter. Do not resort to using other people’s accounts to bank your money. This can get very complicated very quickly.

Unlike most banks, Standard Bank has different banking solutions for foreign nationals and all you need is a valid passport, permit or visa, and proof of residence.

Ask Yourself: Which bank offers banking solutions for foreign nationals? How much will my bank charges be every month?

6. Communication

Buying a South African sim card at the airport is less complicated – all you need is your passport. If you do not buy it at the airport and try to buy it later at a retail shop, you will be asked for your passport and proof of residence. Your +27 sim card is your gateway to communicate with locals as well as family and friends back home.

A new study by Research ICT Africa shows that South Africa has the highest data costs among the continent’s leading economies, which include Egypt, Nigeria, Tanzania, Ghana and Kenya 

Calling an MTN Nigeria subscriber back home? MTN offers discounted international calling rates such as their “R30 International Calling bundles with discounted rates”.

Ask Yourself: Which network provider will I be using? How much is airtime (credit)? How much is data? How do I buy airtime? Where do I buy airtime?

7. Explore

If you will be staying with friends of friends, do not let anyone keep you indoors or collect money to go buy things on your behalf. Explore your surroundings – go to the nearest park for a walk or the shopping mall for some window-shopping. Do not explore your surroundings at night, prioritise your safety first.

The best way to get to know a new place is to walk around when the sun is up. 

If safe to do so, ask as many questions as possible. This is not the time to form ‘big boy’ o. If you are too shy then Google and Quora are your friends.

Ask Yourself: Do I know the surroundings of the area I am living in? If living in other people’s home, am I free to leave anytime? Do I feel in control of my stay in South Africa?

South Africa, James Hall Transport Museum
South Africa, James Hall Transport Museum

8. Travel

If you have enough money then consider going on one or more of our recommended Affordable South African Tourist Attractions. South Africa is a leading travel destination; use this time to travel within the province you are in.

“In 2017, South Africa received 3.5 million travellers. The top five overseas countries with the largest number of tourists visiting South Africa were the USA, UK, Germany, The Netherlands and France.” – (Statistics South Africa: 2017)

9. Spending

Use your money wisely and sparingly. Once again, do not try to do ‘big boy tings’ o. Keep your money safe and do not get distracted by the noise of others. Make sure you know what you are paying for. With that said, maybe you should avoid clubs and clubbing for now.

Be quick to think and slow to pay. 

10. Passport

Always carry your original passport or a certified copy to avoid unnecessary drama. Your passport must be valid (not expired) and you need to have a valid South African visa/permit.

Your passport is your responsibility, do not allow anyone   to keep it ‘safe’ for you.

11. Crime

Do not allow anyone to convince or force you to do any illegal activities or jobs. Anyone who has your best interests at heart will not introduce you to an illegal job or business opportunities.

If any one approaches you with an offer to make quick money doing illegal activities, stay clear of them immediately.

12. Rights

Familiarise yourself with the South African constitution, laws etc. Know your rights and always abide by the law. Try a visit to Constitution Hill, it is one of our favourite Affordable South African Tourist Attractions.

To deny people their human rights is to challenge their very humanity. Nelson Mandela

Nollywood Movies: Nigerians In South Africa & In Nigeria

Do Nigerians in Nigeria and Nigerians in South Africa interpret Nollywood movies the same way?

In 2016, Prof Uchenna Onuzulike published a research study that was aimed at addressing the above question and more. The study compared Nigerians in South Africa and Nigerians in Nigeria to determine what these two groups like (favorite aspects) and dislike (disliked aspects) about Nollywood movies.

#ProudlyAfrican: Nigerians in South Africa and Nigeria prefer Nollywood movies about Nigerian and African cultures. 

The research results demonstrated that the Nigerians in South Africa and Nigerians in Nigeria liked the portrayal of Nigerian/African culture over other topics.

Nollywood movies in Nigeria

What do Nigerians in South Africa like about Nollywood movies?

Culture – 35.90%; Humour – 20.51%; Morals/ Life Lessons – 16.67%; Quality – 14.10%; The Supernatural – 5.13%; Depiction Of Real Life – 2.56%; No Likes – 5.13%; and Wealth – 0%

What do Nigerians in Nigeria like about  Nollywood movies?

Culture – 34.21%; Depiction Of Real Life – 23.68%; No Likes – 15.79%; Quality – 13.16%; Humour – 5.26%; Wealth – 5.26%; Morals/Life Lessons – 2.63%; and The Supernatural – 0%.

Nigerians in Nigeria tended to like reality while Nigerians in South Africa did not but expressed a greater preference for comedy.

#QualityExcites: Nigerians in South Africa do not like poorly produced Nollywood movies

The results also demonstrated that Nigerians in South Africa disliked the “repetition, poor quality and the supernatural” aspects of the movies. The researcher’s analysis demonstrated that the quality of Nollywood movies influence how viewers interpret the movies.

The research findings suggested that nostalgia caused Nigerians outside Nigeria to look for movies that enabled them “to escape into a Nigeria that never was”.

What do Nigerians in South Africa dislike about Nollywood movies?

Quality – 34.62%; No Dislike – 33.33%; The Supernatural – 23.08%; Romance – 5.13%; Repetition/ Predictability – 3.85%; and Piracy – 0%.

Nollywood movie makers need to focus on quality

What do Nigerians in Nigeria dislike about Nollywood movies?

Quality – 52.63%; Repetition/ Predictability – 18.42%; Piracy – 13.16%; The Supernatural – 7.89%; Romance – 5.26%; and No Dislikes – 2.63%.

The Nigerians in Nigeria disliked repetition in the movies, which could be considered part of quality issue.

The findings also indicate that the geographic location of Nigerians in South Africa and Nigerians in Nigeria contributed to how they interpreted Nollywood movies.

What the academics want to know:

  • Research approach: Qualitative
  • Sampling technique: Purposive sampling
  • Sample size: 116 participants; 38 Nigerian students from the University of Nigeria Nsukka; 78 Nigerians residing in Johannesburg and Durban, South Africa.
  • Sample characteristics: 18 to 45 years; 92 male and 24 female
  • Their occupations and education were a distinct mix
  • Analysis: The researcher used Reception analysis also known as audience reception.

The Researcher

Prof is Uchenna Onuzulike is an Assistant Professor at Bowie State University’s Department of Communications. He completed a PhD in Communication and Culture at Howard University in 2014, with a dissertation titled Ethnic and Transnational Identities in the Diaspora: A Phenomenological Study of Second-Generation Igbo-American Young Adults. 

Bibliography

Onuzulike, U. 2016. Audience Reactions to the Different Aspects of Nollywood Movies [Online]. Available on: https://cinej.pitt.edu/ojs/index.php/cinej/article/view/137/378. CINEJ Cinema Journal. 5(2). 87-104.

Onuzulike, U. 2017. Curriculum Vitae [Online]. Available on: http://bowiestate.academia.edu/UchennaOnuzulike/CurriculumVitae. Academia

Read more articles about Nigerians on the Lagos to Jozi Blog.

Nigerians in South Africa and Nigerian Organisations

Nigerians who are new to South Africa should familiriase themselves with registered Non-profit Organisations for Nigerians in South Africa. In addition, here is a list of noteworthy organisations for Nigerians in South Africa.

GOVERNMENTAL ORGANISATIONS

1. Nigerian Embassy – Consulate General of Nigeria

About: The main objective of the Consulate General of Nigeria is to fulfill representational activities in the interest of the Government of the Federal Republic of Nigeria on matters pertaining to social, economic, political, cultural and various global issues including the promotion of trade and new opportunities for economic partnership between Nigeria and South Africa.

2. Nigerian High Commission – South Africa

About: The role of the Nigerian High Commission in South Africa is to organize, advance and safeguard the interests of Government of the Federal Republic of Nigeria within South Africa with the ultimate aim of enhancing Nigeria’s security and socio-economic advancement.

Nigerians in South Africa

OTHER ORGANISATIONS

1. Nigerian Union South Africa (NUSA)

About: NUSA is a registered non-profit organisation that is recognised by the Consulate General of Nigeria as the official body that represents all Nigerians in South Africa, regardless of their language, state of origin and ethnicity. The organisation is about “Unity in Diversity” and it represents the interests of Nigerians in South Africa. The Nigerian Union South Africa works closely with the Nigerian High Commission and the Consulate General of Nigeria to address injustices against Nigerians living in South Africa.

2. Nzuko Ndi-Igbo Community Care South Africa

About: This is a registered non-profit organisation that represents and supports Igbo people living in South Africa. This organisation is known for its loyalty towards providing for the socio-economic needs of its members.

3. National Association of Yoruba Descendants Southern Africa (NAYDSA), also known as Ẹgbẹ Ọmọ Yorùbá

About: As the name denotes, this organisation represents the interests of Yoruba descendants in Southern Africa. The organisation is also aimed at promoting the unity of all Yoruba organizations. This organisation is notable for providing scholarships for Yoruba students within South Africa.

4. United Nigerian Wives in South Africa (UWISA)

About: UWISA is a registered non-profit organisation made up of women who are married to Nigerian citizens. The organisation well known for organizing highly publicized actions against xenophobia and related injustices.

STUDENT ORGANISATIONS

1. Nigerian Student Association (Monash University SA)

About: NSA (MUSA) describes itself as an organisation “established to bring Nigerians studying in Monash South Africa together and it aims to ensure and maintain a positive image of Nigeria in South Africa.”

2. Nigerian Students Society (University of Pretoria)

About: The NSS (UP) is a body of Nigerian students studying at the University of Pretoria. The organisation is aimed at empowering and safeguarding the interests of Nigerian students at the University and beyond.

It is beautiful to see Nigerians all over South Africa coming together to portray and showcase a positive image of Nigeria and Nigerians in South Africa. We salute all these great organisations and rally behind each and every organisation that is destined to bring peace, love, and unity.

Nigerian Organisations Registered in South Africa

Crowd of activists

Nigerian organisations in South Africa can be a source of community information and assistance for Nigerians who are new South Africa. However, it is (sometimes) important to ensure that the organisation is registered with the South African government. The great news is that there are numerous registered non-profit organisations (NPOs) for Nigerians in South Africa.

These NPOs are registered with the Department of Social Development in South Africa and established under the Non-profit Organisations Act 71 of 1997. The Department of Social Development explains that the main aim of the NPO Act is to “create an enabling environment for NPOs, setting and maintaining adequate standards of governance and accountability by providing a voluntary registration facility for non-profit organisations”.

What is an NPO or non-profit organisation?

The Department of Social Development defines a non-profit organisation as “a trust, company or other association of persons established for a public purpose and of which its income and property are not distributable to its members or office bearers except as reasonable compensation for services rendered. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and community based organisations (CBOs) are collectively known as nonprofit organisations (NPOs). In some instance, NPOs are also referred to as Civil Society Organisations (CSO)”.

Nigerian organisations registered in South Africa

Here is a list of eight non-profit organisations for Nigerians across different provinces (excluding gauteng) in South Africa .

1. Nigerian Community Association East London Branch (Ohaneze Ndigbo)

Province: Eastern Cape
Registration Number: 067-115 NPO
Registration Date: 04/03/2009

2. Nigerian Welfare Association-Welkom

Province: Free State
Registration Number: 071-986 NPO
Registration Date: 01/10/2009

3. Nigerian Union Western Cape

Province: Western Cape
Registration Number: 074-993 NPO
Registration Date: 19/01/2010

4. Nigerian Community Association (SA)

Province: North West
Registration Number: 089-298 NPO
Registration Date: 01/04/2011

5. Yoruba Development Center

Province: North West
Registration Number: 117-200 NPO
Registration Date: 03/04/2013

6. Nigerian Association Western Cape

Province: Western Cape
Registration Number: 146-110 NPO
Registration Date: 05/12/2014

7. KZN Nigerian Community Forum

Province: Kwazulu Natal
Registration number: 161-374 NPO
Registration Date: 09/11/2015

8. Association of Nigerians living in Venda

Province: Limpopo
Registration Number: 173-349 NPO
Registration Date: 27/07/2016

Related Article: Nigerians in South Africa and Nigerian Organisations